Why I don’t Take Calcium–#1

Throughout my nutritional studies, I learned that whole food, in its original God-created form, is the perfect “software” for our bodies. The design is perfect! I also learned that man-made synthetic supplements are not the perfect “software”. At best, they are only partially assimilated, so even if the label says 100% of the recommended daily value for a nutrient, you may only be absorbing about 10%. What’s happening to the other 90%?

The other consideration when taking supplements is that neither too much nor too little is beneficial. Both an excess and a deficiency of nutrients are determined by a fairly narrow range. Random supplementation can upset this balance. Small insufficiencies and excesses can contribute to many health problems.

Often, people ask me about taking calcium and other supplements. As a rule, I don’t recommend isolated supplements. Instead, I recommend eating a better diet and using supplements made from real, whole foods.

With that said, I am going to devote the next several newsletters to why I don’t take calcium and how it can actually be toxic in excess. I will be referencing the book Death by Calcium by Thomas E. Levy, MD, JD, which is based upon much scientific research and many clinical studies over 25 years.

People in the US take more calcium than anywhere else in the world and have the highest incidence of osteoporosis. We are ranked 33rd in life expectancy and yet are number one in how much we spend on health care.

The current paradigm says that if we have weak bones, we must have a calcium deficiency, so therefore, we need to take calcium. Dr. Levy does not agree with this model.

To clarify, calcium is essential for bodily function but can be toxic in excess. It can promote disease where this excess accumulates. The crazy thing is that these calcium deposits can trigger more calcium to be released from the bones!

Almost without exception, those with osteoporosis have toxic levels of calcium outside of bone tissue. This excess can contribute to heart attack, kidney failure, stroke, high blood pressure, and cancer. Excess calcium has also been implicated in fueling and accelerating chronic diseases.

Fifteen independent clinical studies indicate that taking an extra 500 mg. of calcium per day can increase the risk of heart attack by 30% and the likelihood of a stroke by up to 20%. There is also a greater risk of death from coronary heart disease and cancer. To make matters worse, the calcium supplementation failed to improve bone strength.

A study of more than 61,000 people over 19 years reported that those with a calcium intake of over 1400 mg. per day had a 40% increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease and a 114% increased risk of death from reduced flow of blood to the heart muscle.

Over one-third of Americans over the age of 45 have some arterial calcification. Much of this plaque is the accumulation of calcium salts.

Advanced MRIs found calcifications in 95% of malignant prostate glands.

Calcifications are frequently found on mammographies of women with breast cancer. Many breast biopsies are done due to these findings. Studies show that breast cancer patients who have calcifications are less likely to survive the disease than those who don’t.

A recently published study found a strong association between increased calcium levels and death from any cause.

Inhibiting calcium uptake seems to make cancer less invasive and less prone to grow new blood cells.

Chronically high levels of calcium in cells seems to play a significant role in degenerative neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Lou Gehrig’s (ALS).

Calcium channel blockers are a group of drugs designed to inhibit the uptake of calcium into cells. They have been used effectively to treat high blood pressure and to reduce the events associated with high blood pressure. By limiting the uptake of calcium into cells, calcium channel blockers have an anti-atherosclerosis effect.

Studies that were done involving over 175,000 patients, using three common calcium channel blockers, found that all three significantly reduced death from all causes.

You may be wondering why you’re not hearing about this from your doctor. Between 2010 and 2013, there has been much published in medical literature journals about how calcium can accumulate in the body and become toxic from supplements and excess dairy consumption. Sadly, this information is buried and seldom read. Not to mention, that it is an overwhelming task to change the current business model that includes the medical establishment, dairy industry, and supplement companies, to an individual healthy lifestyle approach.

So, the real problem seems to be not that we have a lack of calcium in our diets, but that calcium is being relocated from our bones to other areas of the body. I’ll continue to explore this further in future newsletters.

If you want to start a conversation about this topic, feel free to post your questions or comments in the Facebook group.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

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Teaching Our Kids to be Healthy!

Grandpa Hernandez and I will be enjoying our grandkids for several weeks throughout the summer, and that means feeding them!  We love to make them smile, so sometimes we give them sodas and artificially-colored crunchy things in a bag, as well as ice cream and candy.  Of course, these junk foods are also accompanied by a lesson from me about why they aren’t good for them!

I’ve decided to create a nutrition program for my hungry grandkids, so they can learn the basics of what to eat and how it affects their health.  It will teach them to understand food labels and ingredients and how to plan healthy meals and snacks, grocery shop, and cook.

Of course, I need to find ways to make it fun and practical, and reading, writing, math, science, and research will all be built right into the program, as well as what the Bible says about nutrition (history and spiritual lessons).

At the end of the summer, I want my grandchildren (ages 8 to 13) to know the basics of healthy eating and to feel comfortable in the kitchen. I want them to have a customized collection of their favorite healthy recipes and how to choose healthier versions of foods they love.

After all, they will be eating for the rest of their lives, and good health is the foundation of everything else they will do.

This will keep me pretty busy, so I’ll let you know how the program’s going and what we’re learning throughout the summer as time and energy permits.

In the meantime, if you want to use the summer to start working on a healthy eating program for yourself and your family, check out my online do-it-your-self Eat to be Healthy Program.

Have a happy, healthy summer!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

 

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Two Hormones that may be Contributing to Excess Belly Fat

To help balance your appetite, you need balanced levels of the hormones ghrelin and leptin.

Ghrelin signals hunger and then decreases for approximately three hours after a meal.  When levels remain chronically high, abdominal fat is often formed, which can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Leptin signals fullness, affecting your appetite and metabolism.  The right amount is beneficial for weight control.  Studies have shown that foods can either block or increase leptin levels.  You neither want too little or too much.

Eating low-nutrient foods (sodas, refined flours, refined sugars, etc.) can block the production of leptin, which can keep you from feeling full and result in overeating.

Eating low-nutrient foods can also, over time, lead to chronically high leptin levels, and the body can become leptin resistant.  This is similar to how chronically high blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance.  Most diabetics are also leptin resistant.  Both conditions can contribute to weight gain, especially around the abdomen.

The good news is that losing excess weight helps increase sensitivity to leptin!

Factors that affect ghrelin and leptin levels:

*MSG (monosodium glutamate) can decrease leptin levels (www.msgtruth.org).

*Omega-3 fats found in walnuts, grass-fed meat, wild-caught fish, and seeds (flax, chia, hemp) help balance leptin levels.

*Eating approximately every four hours can help keep ghrelin levels from getting too high so your appetite doesn’t get out of control.

*Eating high-fiber foods can reduce ghrelin by helping you feel full.

*Refined sugars and refined grains increase ghrelin levels.

*Eating too few calories can interfere with ghrelin and leptin levels, actually contributing to weight gain.

*Eating protein at every meal and snack can help lower ghrelin levels.

*Less than seven hours of sleep each night can result in higher ghrelin levels and lower leptin levels.

*Too much stress affects everything, including ghrelin and leptin levels!

My Eat to be Healthy online program is now available!  This is the basic nutrition program that I use with my clients to help them lay a foundation of healthy eating.  I’ve packaged all the PDFs together into a do-it-yourself program, making it extremely cost effective–only $39!

You get 20 PDF documents that you can download to your computer or other device:

Eat to be Healthy Guide to give you a recommended plan of action.

Why Diets Don’t Work

Goal Setting Worksheet

Connecting the Dots template to help you keep track of what you eat and how you feel, along with a link to the Bristol Stool Chart so you can make poop observations.😛

The Healthy Plate Guide (ratio of protein, fat, starchy & non-starchy carbs)

The Healthy Plate Meal Planner Guide template (you can make copies)

and two weeks of Sample Meal Plan Menus

2017 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce

Seven Tips for Adding Healthy, Whole Foods

20 Healthy Snack Ideas

Guide to a Rainbow of Nutrients

Mindful Eating Tips

Water Works

Factors Affecting Weight Loss

Label Reading Guidelines

Eating Out Tips

List of Healthy Lifestyle Habits (three pages of recommended habits to learn)

Resources (a list of books, websites, apps, and more to help you eat to be healthy)

Scripture for Memorization and Encouragement (God-power vs. willpower)

As a special bonus, when you purchase this program through the link in this blog, I’ll send you a PDF of my 16-page Learning to be Healthy Recipes.

Of course, you can email me with any questions you have about the program and receive additional support, encouragement, and accountability in the private Facebook group:  www.facebook.com/groups/learningtobehealthywithlisa.

Here’s the link to get your Eat to be Healthy online program:

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=U6KKG824BHUDJ

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

 

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Is your meat glued together?

Have you ever found rib eye on the menu of a restaurant for an unusually low price that seemed too good to be true?  Could it be because it was made from scraps of meat served the day before that were formed together with “meat glue” to look like the perfect steak?

“Meat glue” is also used as a binder to thicken and/or improve the texture of some meats.  For instance, it’s often used to give uniform texture to sausages, hot dogs, and other processed meats, and to make flourless noodles out of seafood.  It may also be used to improve the texture of some foods, like fat-free yogurts and cheese.

Meat glue” or transglutaminase (TG enzyme) is an additive that interacts with protein to create a tight bond to hold food together.  It’s sprinkled on beef, chicken, turkey, pork, or seafood, bound tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerated for several hours to create perfectly formed, cost-effective products.

TG enzyme is typically made from bacteria, and most of it is supplied by the same company that introduced MSG (monosodium glutamate) to America.  Sometimes, it’s made from the blood plasma of pigs and cows.

The Center for Disease Control has reported that one in six Americans (around 48,000,000) get food poisoning every year.  Could “meat glue” be a contributor?

E. coli, listeria, and salmonella are found mostly on the surfaces of meats, which is killed when cooked.  That’s why it’s generally safe to eat a steak rare or medium rare.  If “meat glue” is used to reform pieces of meat together, bacteria is now introduced throughout the meat.

A study in 2015, published by researchers from Israel and Germany, named transglutaminase as one of the contributors to “leaky gut.”  This was part of their research on the relationship between industrial food additives and the rise of autoimmune disease.  There has been a steady rise in Western cultures over the last 30 years in these diseases, including celiac, Crohn’s, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus.

If you are avoiding gluten because of an autoimmune disease (especially celiac), pay attention to how you feel when consuming meat products that may use “meat glue” to hold them together.  It can irritate the gut and contribute to inflammation

When dining out, beware of prices that seem too good to be true. The item served could be scraps of meat that were served the day before.

Sushi found on buffets and in supermarkets may also be suspect for being pieced, or “glued,” together.  Quality sushi will cost a little more.

When buying prepared beef, chicken, turkey, pork, or seafood in the supermarket (usually frozen or served as an entree), check the ingredients for the words “transglutaminase,” “TG enzyme,” “formed,” or “reformed”.

Choose fresh cuts of meat with no additives, and cook them yourself.

Studies continue to show that eating processed meats, especially sausage, bacon, hot dogs, salami, and lunch meats, increases the risk for cancer.

Go here to watch a video about “meat glue”.  

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

The Connection between Artificial Sweeteners, Blood Sugar, and Weight Loss

If you are using artificial sweeteners as a way to help control your weight or blood sugar, think again!

An Israeli study in 2014 found that artificial sweeteners (aspartame, saccharin, and sucralose) raised blood sugar levels in mice.  They followed up with research on approximately 400 non-diabetic individuals and found that consumption of artificial sweeteners increased their blood sugar levels similar to those found in the mice.

Artificial sweeteners also alter gut bacteria, which is an important part of blood sugar regulation.

It is well documented that chronic high blood sugar levels can lead to obesity.

A recent study of more than 3,000 pregnant women and their infants found that mothers who consumed more beverages containing artificial sweeteners were twice as likely to have children who were overweight than those who used less.  (Research led by Meghan Azad, assistant professor of pediatrics and child health at the University of Manitoba.)

If that’s not enough to make you cautious about your intake of artificial sweeteners, here’s a few more thoughts:

A 2015 press release pointed out that the Center for Science in the Public Interest recommends that consumers avoid aspartame (NutraSweet is a brand name) and has urged food manufacturers not to use it.  CSPI based their recommendations on studies that link cancer, including brain tumors, to the consumptiontion of aspartame.

A study at the University of Iowa of almost 60,000 women found that, on average, those who consumed at least two or more diet sodas per day had a higher body mass index, as well as higher rates of diabetes and high blood pressure.  All of these conditions can contribute to heart disease.

A 2014 study at the University of North Dakota found a connection to neurological heath.  Those participants who maintained a short-term high-aspertame diet were more depressed and irritable. They also performed worse on spatial orientation tests.

The Journal of Applied Nutrition (1988) reported the results of a survey by the late Dr. H. J. Roberts, a diabetes specialist that analyzed the reactions of 551 individuals to NutraSweet (aspartame) consumption.  He found the most common reactions were headaches, dizziness, memory loss, confusion, vision problems, depression, irritability, and anxiety attacks.

Dr. Roberts wrote a book, Aspartame Disease:  An Ignored Epidemic (published in 2001), in which he documents a more detailed account of the above reactions, along with less common reactions, like low blood sugar, bloating, skin problems, restless leg syndrome, abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, shortness of breath, thinning hair, blindness, burning urination, and joint pain.

Read the ingredients on all foods, beverages, gum, vitamins (especially children’s), and even over-the-counter drugs.  Aspartame alone is in an estimated 6,000 diet and sugar-free products!

If a label says it contains “phenylalanine,” aspartame is one of the ingredients.

Avoid saccharin, Sweet ‘n Low, sucralose, Splenda, aspartame, NutraSweet, and other artificial sweeteners.  You are not made of artificial ingredients, so they have no place in your body!

For a more complete list of artificial sweeteners, visit this link:  https://www.doctoroz.com/article/list-names-artificial-sweeteners

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

Need some help with planning healthy meals, along with daily health tips and motivation?  Check out my 6-Week Health Transformation!

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Eating outside the “Box”

After Hurricane Harvey, my household grew by seven–my daughter, son-in-law, three grandkids, and two granddogs.  My husband and I are thankful that we have a dry house where they can stay as they recover from the five feet of water that destroyed their apartment.

School has resumed, and my beautiful grandchildren are up at 6:30 a.m. and out the door shortly after 7:00.  Like so many families, mornings don’t allow much time for breakfast, and convenience foods like toaster pastries and granola bars are easy to grab and eat on the go.  These foods are mostly simple sugars, with insignificant amounts of protein and healthy fat, which are needed to give strength and sustained energy for learning, playing, and growing bodies and minds.

When I quiz them about what they have for school lunches, so far it’s been cheeseburgers, pizza, potatoes, etc.  One of my grandson’s classmates felt sorry for him since he lost his home, so he gave him a Honeybun.  That was a thoughtful act of kindness, but you can see that there’s no shortage of refined carbohydrates available to our children.

My mission as grandma and nutritionist is to find creative ways (outside the “box”) to get nutrients into their bodies so they’ll have the fuel they need to meet academic, physical, and social challenges.  It starts with me being present in the kitchen and dialoguing with them about how food affects their brain and body.  We talk about eating outside the “box”.

I appealed to my 12-year-old grandson by telling him that he needs protein to build muscle.  I offered him a snack bag filled with a handful of raw cashews to put in his back pack.  I cooked some organic frozen corn in a little olive oil and organic butter, and he ate a bowlful for breakfast.  This was eating outside the “box” for him.

My other grandson and granddaughter wanted frozen waffles topped with pure maple syrup and hemp seeds (we call them sprinkles).  The hemp seeds add protein and healthy fats, which the brain needs to function at its best.  My granddaughter took raw cashews (good source of calcium) in her snack bag, and my grandson took raw sunflower seeds (good source of vitamin E).

Two of my three grandkids drank some chlorophyll water (we call it leprechaun juice because it’s green).  Chlorophyll is what makes leaves green.  It helps increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood.  We use one from Nature’s Sunshine that’s made from alfalfa and contains spearmint oil, which is a natural remedy for indigestion and bloating.  I mix about one teaspoonful into eight ounces of water.

I remind them to drink water in the mornings to hydrate their brains so they’ll be ready to think.  We do a little math to explain the average amount they need to drink each day.  They divide their weight by two to get the number of ounces of water.  Since they often consume water in bottles, we decide how many they need to drink to meet their daily requirement.

I asked one of my grandsons if he would eat dragons’ tails (green beans) or broccoli for breakfast.  He said yes!  I told him that was eating outside the “box”.  Guess what I’m going to serve in the morning?

My grandchildren are helping me experiment with different “energy bar” recipes.  The first one I tried was the consistency of sticky cookie dough, which they enjoyed as an after-school snack and again this morning.  I mixed almond flour (a handful of ground almonds) with collagen powder (protein), raw honey, unsweetened applesauce, coconut flour, vanilla, unsweetened peanut butter, and dairy-free chocolate chips.  They were a hit!

I also try to use meal time to teach them to read ingredients on packaged foods and drinks.  Little by little, we must teach our children to learn to be healthy.  It’s foundational to their success!

Come on over to the Learning to be Healthy Facebook Group and share some healthy breakfast and snack tips or a favorite energy bar recipe!

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com

www.pinterest.com/healthywithlisa

www.facebook.com/learningtobehealthy

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

 

Are food allergies and/or food sensitivities affecting your health?

Food allergies usually involve an immediate immune response that can cause potentially life-threatening reactions, like anaphylactic shock.  Other symptoms may include vomiting, diarrhea, blood in the stool, eczema, hives, skin rashes, wheezing, and a runny nose.

On the other hand, food sensitivities and intolerances are toxic reactions to foods that do not involve the immune system.  In addition to those symptoms listed for food allergies, a food sensitivity may also cause fatigue, gas, bloating, mood swings, migraines, nervousness, and eating disorders.

Food sensitivities can cause delayed reactions, making them more difficult to pinpoint.  You can have a negative result from a food allergy test and still have a food sensitivity that causes symptoms.

Research is growing that connects food sensitivities to nutrient malabsorption, leaky gut, acne, irritable bowel syndrome, joint pain, ADD, ADHD, anxiety, depression, brain fog, dizziness, and autoimmune conditions.  There is also accumulating evidence that food sensitivities can increase the severity of symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and other diseases normally not considered food related.

How do you know if you have a food sensitivity?

Start by keeping a written journal.  Record what you eat, how you feel, and poop observations.  Pay special attention to how you feel within an hour after you eat.  Do this for at least two weeks, and then see if you can make any connections.

Another way to check for a food sensitivity is the pulse test.  Take your resting pulse for one full minute, and record that number as beats per minute.  Eat some of the food that you want to test, and then wait 20 minutes while resting.  Retake your pulse, and record the beats per minute.  If there is a rise in your pulse rate by six or more beats per minute, you might suspect a food sensitivity.  Make sure that nothing else was responsible for the rise in pulse, like moving around or becoming excited or stressed.

If you need to go a step further, there are newer blood tests that are reported to be very accurate in determining food sensitivities through Cyrex Labs.  Check with your doctor to see if they do this type of testing and, if not, look for a doctor who does.  A functional medical doctor, naturopathic doctor, or some chiropractors will most likely do this type of testing.

Feel free to share your discoveries and ask questions in the Learning to be Healthy with Lisa private Facebook group.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com

www.pinterest.com/healthywithlisa

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.