Eat lutein for healthy eyes!

Lutein helps protect the eyes from damage which can lead to cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It is found in high concentrations in the macula of the human eye, known as the “macula lutea”.  Dark green and yellow orange foods are good sources of lutein.

Studies confirm that as lutein levels increase in the eyes, there is a decrease in the amount of harmful light rays that reach the retina, where vision is produced.

Based on studies, the recommended daily amount of lutein to benefit vision is 12 mg.

One cup of cooked kale or spinach will give you more than 20 mg. of lutein.  You can get an average of 12 mg. from one cup of cooked Swiss chard, collard greens, mustard greens, or turnip greens, and a large orange bell pepper contains about 9 mg.  The amount of lutein will vary based upon the nutrient content of the soil in which the food was grown, whether or not it is organic, and how it is prepared.

Other foods that contain varying amounts of lutein include romaine lettuce, leafy greens, asparagus, carrots, squash, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, broccoli, green peas, beet greens, Brussels sprouts, sweet corn, egg yolk, and green lentils.

Increase lutein in your daily diet by adding herbs and spices like basil, thyme, paprika, cayenne pepper, parsley, cilantro, marjoram, oregano, sage, cumin, chili powder, mustard seed, and cinnamon.

Nature’s Sunshine makes Lutein, a supplement that contains 10 mg. of lutein per capsule. You can order it at www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com.

Lutein-Rich Soup

Rinse one pound of organic green lentils, and place in a large stainless steel cooking pot with 10 cups of filtered water.

Add:

1 chopped yellow onion

2 stalks chopped, organic celery

1 peeled and diced sweet potato

2 peeled and diced organic yellow potatoes

4 large chopped, organic carrots

Bring to a boil, cover, reduce heat, and simmer for about an hour, until lentils are tender.

Stir in:

1 tablespoon mineral-rich salt

2 teaspoons chopped fresh, organic thyme or 4 teaspoons dried

2 teaspoons organic cumin

1/2 teaspoon organic black pepper or 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon organic cayenne pepper

Juice of 1 lemon or 1 tablespoon organic apple cider vinegar

4 garlic cloves, chopped or pressed

Continue to simmer for about half an hour or so.

When done, stir in 1 cup organic cilantro or parsley and 1 cup organic spinach or kale.  Cover and let greens soften in hot soup.

Alternatively, instead of adding cilantro or parsley to soup pot, top each bowl of soup with a handful of the fresh herbs.

Serving idea:  Cut off tops and scoop out seeds of organic orange bell peppers.  Ladle some soup inside.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist, CNHP

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com

www.facebook.com/learningtobehealthy

www.pinterest.com/healthywithlisa

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

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Are your eyes, skin, and immune system indicating that you might be lacking in vitamin A?

One of the first signs of a possible vitamin A deficiency is poor night vision, an inability of the eyes to adjust to darkness.  Additional signs that a lack of vitamin A may be affecting the eyes are difficulty distinguishing between blue and yellow, dry or inflamed eyes, and styes.  When eyes are exposed to long periods of watching television, computer screens, or glaring lights, more vitamin A may be required.

Skin, hair, and nails can also reflect inadequate vitamin A levels.  Some signs of possible deficiency can include weak or brittle nails and hair, skin that is dry and/or scaly, dry or dull hair, tiny bumps on the backs of the upper arms, dry mouth, roughness on elbows, dandruff, and skin pigmentation abnormalities.

Vitamin A is also crucial for a healthy immune system, adrenal glands, and thyroid, and for building strong bones and teeth.  A deficiency can lead to a loss of vitamin C, and zinc is needed to transport vitamin A from the liver to where is it needed in the body.  Breathing polluted air may increase the need for vitamin A.

There has been much research on the relationship between vitamin A and cancer risk.  Animal studies have shown that cancer-causing carcinogens remain more active when there is a vitamin A deficiency.  Vitamin A has a protective effect against cancer on the tissues of the skin, throat, and lungs.  Many studies have suggested that cancers of the bladder, larynx, esophagus, stomach, colon/rectum, uterus, cervix, and prostate benefit from beta-carotene (gives plants their yellow and orange color), which is converted to vitamin A in the body.

Researchers found that vitamin A can significantly reduce the immune-depressive effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments!

A high intake of carotenes (plant forms of vitamin A) is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease.

The best way to get your vitamin A is from food, and since it’s a fat-soluble vitamin, you must eat enough good fat to help absorb it.  In contrast, vitamin A is destroyed by harmful fats like hydrogenated and other refined oils, as well as deep-fried foods.  These are in most processed foods!  Animal foods like butter, milk, cheese, and eggs contain vitamin A, but when the fat is skimmed off milk, so is the vitamin A.  If you throw away the egg yolks, you won’t get the vitamin A.  When it comes to animal foods, they are only as healthy as the animals they came from.  The animals get vitamin A from eating their natural diet (grass-fed), and if they were given antibiotics and/or hormones, it can affect our health.

Eat fruits and vegetables that are yellow-orange like carrots (that’s where carotene got its name), squash, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, orange and yellow peppers, cantaloupe, papaya, mango, and pineapple.  The deeper the color, the greater the beta-carotene content.  Green vegetables are also rich sources of beta-carotene.  The chlorophyll that makes them green overpowers the yellow-orange pigments and is a good cleanser for the digestive tract and blood.  Spinach, kale, and beet greens actually contain more beta-carotene than carrots.

To get more carotene from vegetables, lightly cook them to rupture the cell membranes, and eat them with healthy fats and protein.  Sometimes, I eat half of a baked sweet potato for breakfast.  I pre-bake the potato the night before, and then squeeze it out of its skin into a pan the next morning.  While it’s warming on the stove, I add some organic butter or ghee, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, dried cranberries, and walnuts or pumpkin seeds.  You could use coconut oil in place of the butter.

The recommended daily amount of beta-carotene is 1,000 to 5,000 RE (retinol equivalent) in the form of beta-carotene, which is non-toxic.  Preformed vitamin A can be toxic and should only be taken under the advice of your health care provider.

Nature’s Sunshine makes an excellent supplement called Carotenoid Blend. (www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com).

An average carrot contains 1,000 RE.

Baked Carrots:

Wash, cut off tops, and peel outer layer (optional) of several whole organic carrots.  Lay them in a single layer on a baking sheet.  Drizzle with extra-virgin olive, avocado, or coconut oil.  Use your hands to coat the carrots with the oil.  If desired, sprinkle with some mineral-rich salt, garlic, black pepper, fresh herbs, etc.  Bake at 350 degrees until fork tender.  The amount of time will vary, depending on the thickness of your carrots, about 20 to 30 minutes.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist, CNHP

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com (Carotenoid Blend by Nature’s Sunshine)

www.facebook.com/learningtobehealthy

www.pinterest.com/healthywithlisa

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Support your health with sulfur–nature’s detoxifier and “beauty mineral.”

Sulfur is part of the immune system and aids the liver in detoxifying chemicals and toxins from the body.  This helps protect us from illness, including chronic disease and cancer.

Sulfur is also necessary for repairing the body and promoting the health of hair, skin, nails, and joints.  It’s known as nature’s “beauty mineral.”

Sulfur is found in insulin, the hormone that regulates carbohydrate metabolism.

Sulfur is a component of bile, which is made by the liver to help digest fats.

Sulfur-rich foods include onions, garlic, egg yolks, legumes, and cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussels sprouts, mustard greens, horseradish, radish, daikon, kale, turnips, rutabaga, arugula, bok choy, collard greens, watercress, wasabi, and mustard seeds).

Boost your immune system with a serving or two of sulfur-rich foods in your daily diet.

Note:  If you have a weak thyroid, it may be beneficial for you to lightly steam cruciferous vegetables.  Cooking reduces compounds that may interfere with iodine uptake, a nutrient needed to make thyroid hormone.  Overcooking can reduce sulfur compounds.

Nature’s Sunshine sells an MSM (MethylSulfonylMethane) supplement that is a form of organic sulfur commonly used to help strengthen connective tissues and reduce inflammation, including that in the lungs, muscles, and joints.  Find it at www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist, CNHP

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

Download your free guide:  10 Simple Steps to a Leaner, Healthier You! at www.learningtobehealthy.com

www.facebook.com/learningtobehealthy

www.pinterest.com/healthywithlisa

www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com (Nature’s Sunshine)

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.