Teaching Our Kids to be Healthy!

Grandpa Hernandez and I will be enjoying our grandkids for several weeks throughout the summer, and that means feeding them!  We love to make them smile, so sometimes we give them sodas and artificially-colored crunchy things in a bag, as well as ice cream and candy.  Of course, these junk foods are also accompanied by a lesson from me about why they aren’t good for them!

I’ve decided to create a nutrition program for my hungry grandkids, so they can learn the basics of what to eat and how it affects their health.  It will teach them to understand food labels and ingredients and how to plan healthy meals and snacks, grocery shop, and cook.

Of course, I need to find ways to make it fun and practical, and reading, writing, math, science, and research will all be built right into the program, as well as what the Bible says about nutrition (history and spiritual lessons).

At the end of the summer, I want my grandchildren (ages 8 to 13) to know the basics of healthy eating and to feel comfortable in the kitchen. I want them to have a customized collection of their favorite healthy recipes and how to choose healthier versions of foods they love.

After all, they will be eating for the rest of their lives, and good health is the foundation of everything else they will do.

This will keep me pretty busy, so I’ll let you know how the program’s going and what we’re learning throughout the summer as time and energy permits.

In the meantime, if you want to use the summer to start working on a healthy eating program for yourself and your family, check out my online do-it-your-self Eat to be Healthy Program.

Have a happy, healthy summer!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

 

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

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Two Hormones that may be Contributing to Excess Belly Fat

To help balance your appetite, you need balanced levels of the hormones ghrelin and leptin.

Ghrelin signals hunger and then decreases for approximately three hours after a meal.  When levels remain chronically high, abdominal fat is often formed, which can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Leptin signals fullness, affecting your appetite and metabolism.  The right amount is beneficial for weight control.  Studies have shown that foods can either block or increase leptin levels.  You neither want too little or too much.

Eating low-nutrient foods (sodas, refined flours, refined sugars, etc.) can block the production of leptin, which can keep you from feeling full and result in overeating.

Eating low-nutrient foods can also, over time, lead to chronically high leptin levels, and the body can become leptin resistant.  This is similar to how chronically high blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance.  Most diabetics are also leptin resistant.  Both conditions can contribute to weight gain, especially around the abdomen.

The good news is that losing excess weight helps increase sensitivity to leptin!

Factors that affect ghrelin and leptin levels:

*MSG (monosodium glutamate) can decrease leptin levels (www.msgtruth.org).

*Omega-3 fats found in walnuts, grass-fed meat, wild-caught fish, and seeds (flax, chia, hemp) help balance leptin levels.

*Eating approximately every four hours can help keep ghrelin levels from getting too high so your appetite doesn’t get out of control.

*Eating high-fiber foods can reduce ghrelin by helping you feel full.

*Refined sugars and refined grains increase ghrelin levels.

*Eating too few calories can interfere with ghrelin and leptin levels, actually contributing to weight gain.

*Eating protein at every meal and snack can help lower ghrelin levels.

*Less than seven hours of sleep each night can result in higher ghrelin levels and lower leptin levels.

*Too much stress affects everything, including ghrelin and leptin levels!

My Eat to be Healthy online program is now available!  This is the basic nutrition program that I use with my clients to help them lay a foundation of healthy eating.  I’ve packaged all the PDFs together into a do-it-yourself program, making it extremely cost effective–only $39!

You get 20 PDF documents that you can download to your computer or other device:

Eat to be Healthy Guide to give you a recommended plan of action.

Why Diets Don’t Work

Goal Setting Worksheet

Connecting the Dots template to help you keep track of what you eat and how you feel, along with a link to the Bristol Stool Chart so you can make poop observations.😛

The Healthy Plate Guide (ratio of protein, fat, starchy & non-starchy carbs)

The Healthy Plate Meal Planner Guide template (you can make copies)

and two weeks of Sample Meal Plan Menus

2017 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce

Seven Tips for Adding Healthy, Whole Foods

20 Healthy Snack Ideas

Guide to a Rainbow of Nutrients

Mindful Eating Tips

Water Works

Factors Affecting Weight Loss

Label Reading Guidelines

Eating Out Tips

List of Healthy Lifestyle Habits (three pages of recommended habits to learn)

Resources (a list of books, websites, apps, and more to help you eat to be healthy)

Scripture for Memorization and Encouragement (God-power vs. willpower)

As a special bonus, when you purchase this program through the link in this blog, I’ll send you a PDF of my 16-page Learning to be Healthy Recipes.

Of course, you can email me with any questions you have about the program and receive additional support, encouragement, and accountability in the private Facebook group:  www.facebook.com/groups/learningtobehealthywithlisa.

Here’s the link to get your Eat to be Healthy online program:

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=U6KKG824BHUDJ

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

 

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Is your meat glued together?

Have you ever found rib eye on the menu of a restaurant for an unusually low price that seemed too good to be true?  Could it be because it was made from scraps of meat served the day before that were formed together with “meat glue” to look like the perfect steak?

“Meat glue” is also used as a binder to thicken and/or improve the texture of some meats.  For instance, it’s often used to give uniform texture to sausages, hot dogs, and other processed meats, and to make flourless noodles out of seafood.  It may also be used to improve the texture of some foods, like fat-free yogurts and cheese.

Meat glue” or transglutaminase (TG enzyme) is an additive that interacts with protein to create a tight bond to hold food together.  It’s sprinkled on beef, chicken, turkey, pork, or seafood, bound tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerated for several hours to create perfectly formed, cost-effective products.

TG enzyme is typically made from bacteria, and most of it is supplied by the same company that introduced MSG (monosodium glutamate) to America.  Sometimes, it’s made from the blood plasma of pigs and cows.

The Center for Disease Control has reported that one in six Americans (around 48,000,000) get food poisoning every year.  Could “meat glue” be a contributor?

E. coli, listeria, and salmonella are found mostly on the surfaces of meats, which is killed when cooked.  That’s why it’s generally safe to eat a steak rare or medium rare.  If “meat glue” is used to reform pieces of meat together, bacteria is now introduced throughout the meat.

A study in 2015, published by researchers from Israel and Germany, named transglutaminase as one of the contributors to “leaky gut.”  This was part of their research on the relationship between industrial food additives and the rise of autoimmune disease.  There has been a steady rise in Western cultures over the last 30 years in these diseases, including celiac, Crohn’s, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus.

If you are avoiding gluten because of an autoimmune disease (especially celiac), pay attention to how you feel when consuming meat products that may use “meat glue” to hold them together.  It can irritate the gut and contribute to inflammation

When dining out, beware of prices that seem too good to be true. The item served could be scraps of meat that were served the day before.

Sushi found on buffets and in supermarkets may also be suspect for being pieced, or “glued,” together.  Quality sushi will cost a little more.

When buying prepared beef, chicken, turkey, pork, or seafood in the supermarket (usually frozen or served as an entree), check the ingredients for the words “transglutaminase,” “TG enzyme,” “formed,” or “reformed”.

Choose fresh cuts of meat with no additives, and cook them yourself.

Studies continue to show that eating processed meats, especially sausage, bacon, hot dogs, salami, and lunch meats, increases the risk for cancer.

Go here to watch a video about “meat glue”.  

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.