Why I don’t Take Calcium–#3

In Why I don’t Take Calcium–#1 and Why I don’t Take Calcium–#2, we looked at how excess calcium in the body is a likely indicator of calcium being pulled from the bones, and that it can also contribute to inflammation in the arteries and other parts of the body, raising the risk of chronic degenerative diseases.

Next, we learned that optimal levels of vitamin C help to reduce inflammation, keep calcium in the bones, lower the risk of fracture, and reduce excess deposits and calcifications in other places. Calcium-laden kidney stones are one example of a vitamin C deficiency.

Let’s look at some various forms of vitamin C supplements:

Ascorbic acid is a common form of vitamin C, but it can upset some people’s stomach due to its acidity. Synthetic vitamin C is usually made from corn, which may be genetically modified. Look for companies that make certified non-GMO products.

Sodium ascorbate is a form of ascorbic acid that is more alkaline, so it is better tolerated when taking large doses. It does not raise blood pressure or cause fluid retention like sodium chloride.

Calcium ascorbate is a combination of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and calcium. This form is often used to help buffer excess acid, making it easier on the stomach. If you are concerned about excess calcium, this would not be the desirable form of vitamin C.

Magnesium ascorbate is a non-acidic combination of magnesium and ascorbic acid, making it easy on the stomach. Many of us are deficient in magnesium, which is also needed for bone health, making this a desirable form. Unfortunately, magnesium ascorbate can be more expensive.

Potassium ascorbate contains both vitamin C and potassium, so it should be taken only under the advice of your health care provider. Too much potassium can cause health problems, especially if you are taking large amounts of potassium ascorbate and/or taking other supplements or medications that contain potassium. On the other hand, if your lab tests show that you need potassium, this may be a beneficial form of vitamin C for you.

Ascorbyl palmitate is a fat-soluble form of vitamin C that provides extra anti-oxidant protection to cells that most water-soluble forms of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) cannot offer. Liposomal delivery (helps with deeper penetration of the nutrient) of ascorbyl palmitate has been used to slow skin aging and has been demonstrated to kill cancer cells in vitro and slow tumor growth in mice more effectively than with ascorbic acid.

Read the labels of all your supplements, medications, and even the food you eat. See if they include any of the above forms of vitamin C.

Dr. Levy, in his book Death by Calcium, recommends a Multi-C Protocol,using liposome-encapsulated vitamin C, sodium ascorbate powder, ascorbyl palmitate, and even intravenously administered vitamin C. For more information on his protocol, see his book.

Note: Vitamin C is safe and non-toxic, even in large amounts, but those with chronic kidney problems need to always check with their doctor before taking any supplements.

If you are looking for a whole-food form of vitamin C, you might consider one made from amla berries.

The free Alzheimer’s and Dementia online summit starts Monday, July 23!

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

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This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

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Why I don’t Take Calcium–#2

In Why I don’t Take Calcium–#1″, we learned that, according to research, taking calcium supplements and/or increasing dietary intake of calcium does not reduce the risk of bone fracture. Also, that an excess build up of calcium in the body can increase the risk of heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, stroke, and other degenerative diseases.

There’s no doubt that bones need calcium to build new bones, but Dr. Levy, in his book Death by Calcium, states that “Calcium migration from the bone is not the cause of osteoporosis, but rather a symptom of it.” So, then, what is the root cause?

It might surprise you to find out (it did me) that a vitamin C deficiency in the bone can lead to a severe loss of bone-building cells and an increase in bone-dissolving cells. Vitamin C acts as an anti-oxidant to protect bones from cellular damage, which contributes to osteoporosis. Studies have confirmed that oxidative stress plays a role in the cause of osteoporosis.

Collagen is necessary in both the formation and strengthening of new bone. Vitamin C is essential to making collagen.

Clinical observations show that a vitamin C deficiency decreases calcium deposition into bones and increases calcium excretion from bones. The excreted calcium can accumulate in other tissues, like arterial walls.

There is a loss of estrogen during menopause, which results in a loss of calcium from bones. Vitamin C has been shown to strengthen bones in both post-menopausal women and lab rats who had their ovaries removed to induce menopause.

The Framingham Osteoporosis Study found that those with the highest vitamin C intake had significantly fewer hip fractures compared to those with the lowest intake.

Research continues to find that the combination of excess calcium and vitamin C deficiency is found at the tissue sites of chronic degenerativediseases. Excess calcium deposits contribute to oxidative stress, and vitamin C is an anti-oxidant to help prevent damage caused by this stress. When oxidative stress is kept in check, calcium can stay in the bones.

In the case of atherosclerosis, the body uses calcium from the blood to produce plaque in the arteries to support weak vessels (due to chronic oxidative stress). The body then pulls calcium from bones into the bloodstream so it will be available for more arterial repair. Sufficient vitamin C levels would help reduce this stress on the arteries, diminishing the need for more calcium to support the arteries.

Besides the coronary arteries, excess blood calcium can be deposited into cells throughout the body (brain, breasts, prostate, etc.). Excess blood calcium can come from dietary calcium, calcium supplements, and/or calcium pulled out of bones. When there are optimal levels of vitamin C present, dietary calcium is deposited into the bones, and any excess is excreted via the kidneys.

Eliminating a vitamin C deficiency is one important step toward improving bone health, as well as reducing the risk of other chronic diseases.

In the next newsletter, I’ll explore various types and benefits of vitamin C supplements and their therapeutic uses.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

www.learningtobehealthy.com

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Citrus fruit–nature’s seasonal medicine!

Citrus fruits supply a healthy amount of vitamin C, which helps protect our bodies from cell damage, as well as improve skin, gums, mood, and memory.  Vitamin C also aids in the absorption of calcium and iron.

A deficiency of vitamin C has been linked to cancer and cardiovascular disease.

The National Cancer Institute has called oranges a complete package of every known natural anti-cancer inhibitor.

Citrus fruits contain pectin, a soluble fiber which helps control cholesterol levels and binds with toxins in the digestive tract to remove them from the body.  In animals, pectin was shown to inhibit the metastasis of prostate and melanoma cancers.

Pectin has been shown to help stabilize blood sugar by lowering glucose absorption in those with type 2 diabetes.

Limone is found in the oil of the peel of oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes, and in smaller amounts in the pulp.  Limone has been shown to cause the regression of tumors.  Studies have shown lower rates of certain cancers in those who regularly consume citrus peel.

Eat some of the pith (white part between the fruit and peel), as it contains high amounts of fiber, pectin, limonene, and other health-protecting compounds.  The peel also has beneficial amounts of these substances, but you need to wash the fruit well and buy organic.

Citrus fruits contain potassium, which helps keep bones strong and protect the cardiovascular system.

Citrus fruits contain flavonoids that help strengthen blood vessel walls and are widely used in Europe to treat diseases of the blood vessels and lymph system, including hemorrhoids, easy bruising, and nosebleeds.

Citrus flavonoids have also been shown to inhibit cancer cell growth, act as anti-inflammatories, and possess anti-viral activity.

An average orange contains about 64 mg of vitamin C, 238 mg of potassium, 61 mg of calcium, and 3 grams of fiber.

Orange pulp contains twice the amount of vitamin C as the peel and 10 times that found in the juice!

For the most health benefits, eat the whole fruit, preferably organic.  When consuming juice, squeeze it fresh.  There is much nutrient loss in packaged juices.  If you do buy juice, choose those with high pulp content to get more of the fiber and pectin.

Eat a serving or two daily during citrus season.  Choose from oranges, tangerines, kumquats, grapefruit, lemons, and limes.

Tip:  When choosing a vitamin C supplement, look for one that contains bioflavonoids.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

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This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

 

Why an apple a day might help keep the doctor away!🍎

In the early 20th century, an article in American Medicine magazine praised the apple as   “. . . therapeutically effective in all conditions of acidosis, gout, rheumatism, jaundice, all liver and gallbladder troubles, nervous and skin diseases caused by sluggish liver, hyperacidity, and states of autointoxication.”

Apples contain a soluble fiber called pectin, shown to have the following properties:

Pectin helps remove lead and other toxic metals from the digestive tract.  This is especially beneficial for those who live in high-traffic urban areas.

Pectin stimulates the growth of beneficial bacteria in the large intestine, which can improve digestion and support the immune system.

Pectin helps lower bad cholesterol (LDL) and raise good cholesterol (HDL), making it useful against heart disease.

Pectin can help balance blood sugar.

Pectin can help manage both constipation and diarrhea.

In addition to pectin:

The peel of an apple contains quercetin, a powerful anti-inflammatory.

Apples contain the mineral boron, which helps increase blood levels of estrogen, acting as a mild “estrogen replacement therapy.”  Estrogen helps prevent calcium and magnesium loss from bones.  Studies showed that just 3 mg of boron a day decreased calcium loss by 40%!  An average apple contains about .5 mg of boron.

According to Psychologist James Penland, at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, a lack of boron can affect mental alertness and test performance by slowing the brain’s electrical activity.  Dr. Penland found that just 3 mg of boron a day increased brain activity.

Fruits, nuts, and beans are some of the best sources of boron, as well as honey.

Bonus benefits:

Apples have compounds that are anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-viral.

When eaten before meals, apples can help suppress the appetite.

Boron may hinder the excretion of magnesium associated with taking diuretics or digitalis.

Recommendation:

Buy organic apples.  According to ewg.org, non-organic apples come in second on the list of produce that contains high amounts of toxic residues.

Try this boron-rich Stovetop Apple Dessert recipe!

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

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This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

 

Anti-Cancer Nutrition

When you cut an apple, oxygen turns it brown, but if you cover it with lemon juice, it will retain its natural color.  The antioxidants in lemon juice protect the apple from damage.  Antioxidants help protect our bodies from damage by cancer-causing agents.

Lemons contain vitamin C, the antioxidant that keeps the apple from turning brown.  Simply adding fresh lemon to your water can give you an antioxidant boost.

Nutrient-dense plant foods, like fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts, and seeds, are rich in antioxidants, including beta-carotene, vitamins C and E, selenium, lutein, alpha-lipoid acid, lycopene, and glutathione.

Glutathione is a powerful antioxidant that the body can manufacture on its own, but it needs the mineral selenium for its construction.  Eating just one or two Brazil nuts a day will provide more than the daily recommended amount of selenium.  Cruciferous vegetables also stimulate the production of glutathione.  These include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, bok choy, and watercress.

Eating more potassium-rich foods can help regulate the ability of cells to receive nutrients and eliminate toxins.  Packaged and processed foods are usually high in sodium and low in potassium.  Fresh produce, beans, nuts, and seeds naturally contain more potassium than sodium.

Cancer feeds on glucose in the blood, and high levels of blood glucose can also compromise the immune system.  Eliminating refined sugar and refined grains in the diet can help balance blood sugar and strengthen the immune system.  A strong immune system helps to fight cancer.

Toxic fats, like hydrogenated oils, shortening, margarine, and refined vegetable oils, can cause cell membranes to become rigid, making it difficult for them to absorb nutrients and release toxins.  Eating healthy fats, like avocados, coconut oil, extra-virgin olive oil, seeds, nuts, coconut, wild-caught fish, and olives, helps restore fluidity to cells.  This reduces inflammation.

Reducing toxic chemicals in food is important to help combat cancer.  Nitrites and nitrates are known carcinogens used to cure hot dogs, bacon, sausage, jerky, and deli meats.  Antioxidants are helpful for neutralizing these damaging chemicals in the stomach, so add some antioxidant-rich foods to your meal if you consume these foods.

Garlic and onion both act as chelators, which means that they latch onto toxins to carry them away from the body before they can do damage.  Garlic has also been shown to stimulate the white blood cells that attack cancer.

Bottom line:

Eat twice as many colorful fruits and vegetables as you do other foods.

Add fresh garlic and onion often to your diet.

Add one or two handfuls of raw nuts and seeds to your daily diet.

Replace refined, toxic fats with healthy ones.

Reduce cancer’s food source by eliminating refined sugar and refined grains to help keep blood sugar balanced.   You may also need to reduce your intake of whole grains, starches, and high-glycemic fruits.

An antioxidant-rich recipe:  Avocado and Bean Wrap

I am now affiliated with Meal Garden as an Expert to help you find healthy recipes and plan healthy meals.  You can check it out here:  www.mealgarden.com

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist, CNHP

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory.”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

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This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Are your eyes, skin, and immune system indicating that you might be lacking in vitamin A?

One of the first signs of a possible vitamin A deficiency is poor night vision, an inability of the eyes to adjust to darkness.  Additional signs that a lack of vitamin A may be affecting the eyes are difficulty distinguishing between blue and yellow, dry or inflamed eyes, and styes.  When eyes are exposed to long periods of watching television, computer screens, or glaring lights, more vitamin A may be required.

Skin, hair, and nails can also reflect inadequate vitamin A levels.  Some signs of possible deficiency can include weak or brittle nails and hair, skin that is dry and/or scaly, dry or dull hair, tiny bumps on the backs of the upper arms, dry mouth, roughness on elbows, dandruff, and skin pigmentation abnormalities.

Vitamin A is also crucial for a healthy immune system, adrenal glands, and thyroid, and for building strong bones and teeth.  A deficiency can lead to a loss of vitamin C, and zinc is needed to transport vitamin A from the liver to where is it needed in the body.  Breathing polluted air may increase the need for vitamin A.

There has been much research on the relationship between vitamin A and cancer risk.  Animal studies have shown that cancer-causing carcinogens remain more active when there is a vitamin A deficiency.  Vitamin A has a protective effect against cancer on the tissues of the skin, throat, and lungs.  Many studies have suggested that cancers of the bladder, larynx, esophagus, stomach, colon/rectum, uterus, cervix, and prostate benefit from beta-carotene (gives plants their yellow and orange color), which is converted to vitamin A in the body.

Researchers found that vitamin A can significantly reduce the immune-depressive effects of radiation and chemotherapy treatments!

A high intake of carotenes (plant forms of vitamin A) is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease.

The best way to get your vitamin A is from food, and since it’s a fat-soluble vitamin, you must eat enough good fat to help absorb it.  In contrast, vitamin A is destroyed by harmful fats like hydrogenated and other refined oils, as well as deep-fried foods.  These are in most processed foods!  Animal foods like butter, milk, cheese, and eggs contain vitamin A, but when the fat is skimmed off milk, so is the vitamin A.  If you throw away the egg yolks, you won’t get the vitamin A.  When it comes to animal foods, they are only as healthy as the animals they came from.  The animals get vitamin A from eating their natural diet (grass-fed), and if they were given antibiotics and/or hormones, it can affect our health.

Eat fruits and vegetables that are yellow-orange like carrots (that’s where carotene got its name), squash, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, orange and yellow peppers, cantaloupe, papaya, mango, and pineapple.  The deeper the color, the greater the beta-carotene content.  Green vegetables are also rich sources of beta-carotene.  The chlorophyll that makes them green overpowers the yellow-orange pigments and is a good cleanser for the digestive tract and blood.  Spinach, kale, and beet greens actually contain more beta-carotene than carrots.

To get more carotene from vegetables, lightly cook them to rupture the cell membranes, and eat them with healthy fats and protein.  Sometimes, I eat half of a baked sweet potato for breakfast.  I pre-bake the potato the night before, and then squeeze it out of its skin into a pan the next morning.  While it’s warming on the stove, I add some organic butter or ghee, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, dried cranberries, and walnuts or pumpkin seeds.  You could use coconut oil in place of the butter.

The recommended daily amount of beta-carotene is 1,000 to 5,000 RE (retinol equivalent) in the form of beta-carotene, which is non-toxic.  Preformed vitamin A can be toxic and should only be taken under the advice of your health care provider.

Nature’s Sunshine makes an excellent supplement called Carotenoid Blend. (www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com).

An average carrot contains 1,000 RE.

Baked Carrots:

Wash, cut off tops, and peel outer layer (optional) of several whole organic carrots.  Lay them in a single layer on a baking sheet.  Drizzle with extra-virgin olive, avocado, or coconut oil.  Use your hands to coat the carrots with the oil.  If desired, sprinkle with some mineral-rich salt, garlic, black pepper, fresh herbs, etc.  Bake at 350 degrees until fork tender.  The amount of time will vary, depending on the thickness of your carrots, about 20 to 30 minutes.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist, CNHP

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

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This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Beans and chocolate–a disease-fighting duo!

Just one-half cup of cooked beans a day has been shown to reduce cholesterol by an average of 10%.  They are an excellent source of fiber, help regulate blood sugar levels, and are linked to lower rates of some cancers.  Beans contain phytoestrogens, which can help reduce hot flashes.

Flavonoids are antioxidants that help defend against heart disease and cancer, and cocoa contains three to five times more flavonoids than green tea.  In one study, the flavonoids in chocolate made the linings of blood vessels more supple, which helped to lower blood pressure and protect against a buildup of arterial plaque.  Flavonoids also help keep blood platelets from sticking together and forming clots, which guards against heart attacks and strokes.

So let’s put these two disease-fighting foods together in a yummy, healthy dessert!

Blend together until smooth:

1/2 cup cooked beans (black beans work well).  If using canned, drain them first, and make sure they have no added ingredients (a little sea salt is okay).  You could even use refried beans.

1 to 4 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder (raw, organic cacao powder is even better).  The more cocoa you use, the stronger the flavor.

4 tablespoons pure maple syrup (more or less).   You could also use raw honey or stevia.  Refined white or brown sugar will negate some of the health benefits.  Make sure that you don’t use “pancake syrup,” which is made with artificial ingredients and high-fructose corn syrup.

1/2 teaspoon unsweetened vanilla extract

This is really rich and makes about two servings.  One-half cup of black beans contains five grams of fiber, seven grams of protein, and zero fat.  Raw cacao powder contains one gram of protein, zero grams of sugar, and almost two grams of fiber per tablespoon.  It’s also a good source of magnesium and iron.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist, CNHP

1 Corinthians 10:31–                                                                                                                             “Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

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This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.