God’s Pharmacy–Ginger

Ginger is commonly found in gingerbread, pumpkin pie, and as a condiment to sushi.  Not only does it add spicy flavor, but ginger contains properties that may benefit your health in more ways than one!

Ginger is affective against influenza viruses and has killed staph bacteria and salmonella in test tubes.

Many find ginger to be a helpful remedy for nausea, vomiting, and motion sickness.  You might want to carry some ginger capsules or tea bags when you travel.

Warm ginger tea is helpful for reducing mucus congestion in sinuses, throat, and lungs.  You can use organic ginger tea bags or ground ginger spice, but fresh ginger root is even better.  Peel and grate or chop about 2 tablespoons of fresh ginger root.  Add to 2 cups of boiling water, reduce to simmer, cover, and steep for 30 minutes.  Drink a cup of warm tea every 2 to 3 hours.

Ginger tea or capsules make good digestive aids to help soothe digestion, especially in cases of nervousness, stress, or illness.

Ginger contains lecithin, which helps break down fats, making it useful for the cardiovascular system and weight control.

Ginger has anti-inflammatory properties, making it beneficial for headaches, joint pain and stiffness, musculoskeletal aches and pains, etc.

Enjoy a cup of warm ginger root tea to help overcome a chill and increase circulation.

Tip:  Ginger is warming and peppermint is cooling.  Combine these two for a nice balance.

Add ground ginger to pancake batter, oatmeal, soup, baked goods, smoothies, and stir-fries.  Use fresh ginger root to spice up fish, chicken, and beef dishes.

Caution:  Avoid ginger if you have peptic ulcers.

One of my favorite reference books:  20,000 Secrets of TEA by Victoria Zak.  I found mine for $5 at Barnes & Noble.  Here’s a link to one on Amazon:

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Eat lutein for healthy eyes!

Lutein helps protect the eyes from damage which can lead to cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It is found in high concentrations in the macula of the human eye, known as the “macula lutea”.  Dark green and yellow orange foods are good sources of lutein.

Studies confirm that as lutein levels increase in the eyes, there is a decrease in the amount of harmful light rays that reach the retina, where vision is produced.

Based on studies, the recommended daily amount of lutein to benefit vision is 12 mg.

One cup of cooked kale or spinach will give you more than 20 mg. of lutein.  You can get an average of 12 mg. from one cup of cooked Swiss chard, collard greens, mustard greens, or turnip greens, and a large orange bell pepper contains about 9 mg.  The amount of lutein will vary based upon the nutrient content of the soil in which the food was grown, whether or not it is organic, and how it is prepared.

Other foods that contain varying amounts of lutein include romaine lettuce, leafy greens, asparagus, carrots, squash, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, broccoli, green peas, beet greens, Brussels sprouts, sweet corn, egg yolk, and green lentils.

Increase lutein in your daily diet by adding herbs and spices like basil, thyme, paprika, cayenne pepper, parsley, cilantro, marjoram, oregano, sage, cumin, chili powder, mustard seed, and cinnamon.

Nature’s Sunshine makes Lutein, a supplement that contains 10 mg. of lutein per capsule. You can order it at www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com.

Lutein-Rich Soup

Rinse one pound of organic green lentils, and place in a large stainless steel cooking pot with 10 cups of filtered water.

Add:

1 chopped yellow onion

2 stalks chopped, organic celery

1 peeled and diced sweet potato

2 peeled and diced organic yellow potatoes

4 large chopped, organic carrots

Bring to a boil, cover, reduce heat, and simmer for about an hour, until lentils are tender.

Stir in:

1 tablespoon mineral-rich salt

2 teaspoons chopped fresh, organic thyme or 4 teaspoons dried

2 teaspoons organic cumin

1/2 teaspoon organic black pepper or 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon organic cayenne pepper

Juice of 1 lemon or 1 tablespoon organic apple cider vinegar

4 garlic cloves, chopped or pressed

Continue to simmer for about half an hour or so.

When done, stir in 1 cup organic cilantro or parsley and 1 cup organic spinach or kale.  Cover and let greens soften in hot soup.

Alternatively, instead of adding cilantro or parsley to soup pot, top each bowl of soup with a handful of the fresh herbs.

Serving idea:  Cut off tops and scoop out seeds of organic orange bell peppers.  Ladle some soup inside.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist, CNHP

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

www.learningtobehealthy.mynsp.com

www.facebook.com/learningtobehealthy

www.pinterest.com/healthywithlisa

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.