The Flu Vaccine–Yes or No?

It’s that time of year to decide whether or not you will get a flu vaccination. My advice as a health coach is to always make an informed decision about anything that affects the health of you and your family.

Information comes from everywhere–the internet, television ads, magazines, billboards, doctors, pharmacies, people you know, etc. Consider the sources–are they trying to sell you something or were they educated for marketing purposes (e.g. pharmacy companies educating doctors and clinics)?

Are you being made aware of any adverse effects? Are you reading the labels? Is what’s right for someone else right for you?

I believe in self-education, because no one knows your body like you do. Learn more about the flu vaccine at National Vaccine Information Center (www.nvic.org).

Personally, I do not get the flu vaccination. Instead, I strengthen my immune system to help fight viruses. My biggest concern with vaccines is the many toxic additives (like aluminum) that may contribute to chronic disease.

Here are a few things that I do at the first sign of illness:

Drink a cup of water with the juice of half a lemon and a dash of cayenne pepper. Sometimes, I add a little raw honey.

Take elderberry, which has been studied and shown to reduce the “shelf life” of viruses. It comes in syrup, tea, capsules, tinctures, and chewables.

Take vitamin D3 to help support my immune system. Have your levels checked every six months or so to see if you fall within the optimum range of 50-60 ng/ml. In the absence of adequate sunlight, especially during winter, levels can drop, providing less protection against the flu and other viruses.

Eat seasonal foods rich in vitamin C: citrus, organic peppers, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, organic potatoes.

Eat seasonal foods rich in sulfur: onions, garlic, cruciferous vegetables, eggs, sardines (eggs and sardines also contain vitamin D3).

Make sure that my digestive system is working well to eliminate toxins by eating plenty of fiber-rich plant foods and taking a probiotic, since 70 to 80% of the immune system is in the gut.

Hydrate with lots of water and nourishing soups to help flush toxins and keep mucous thin so secondary respiratory infections don’t easily take hold.

Take very warm detox baths with a few drops of lavender essential oil, which has anti-viral and calming properties. Diffusing eucalyptus essential oil is wonderful for a stuffy nose and congestion.

Stop eating refined sugar. Instead of reaching for carbonated soft drinks, popsicles, ice cream, etc., try bone broth, fruit and veggie smoothies, homemade soups, green tea, and herbal teas (God’s pharmacy). I like peppermint, ginger, chamomile, raspberry leaf, elderberry, and holy basil (tulsi). Try stirring a little ground cinnamon into a cup of warm water with some raw honey.

Have some natural cough syrups on hand. Two I like are Olba’s Cough Syrupand Zarbee’s Naturals Kid’s Cough Syrup + Mucous.

Rest, pray, and nourish my spirit with the Word of God–“Be still and know that I am God.” Psalm 46:10a

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory.”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

Register now for the free online Autoimmune Revolution from November 5-11.

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

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God’s Pharmacy–Ginger

Ginger is commonly found in gingerbread, pumpkin pie, and as a condiment to sushi.  Not only does it add spicy flavor, but ginger contains properties that may benefit your health in more ways than one!

Ginger is affective against influenza viruses and has killed staph bacteria and salmonella in test tubes.

Many find ginger to be a helpful remedy for nausea, vomiting, and motion sickness.  You might want to carry some ginger capsules or tea bags when you travel.

Warm ginger tea is helpful for reducing mucus congestion in sinuses, throat, and lungs.  You can use organic ginger tea bags or ground ginger spice, but fresh ginger root is even better.  Peel and grate or chop about 2 tablespoons of fresh ginger root.  Add to 2 cups of boiling water, reduce to simmer, cover, and steep for 30 minutes.  Drink a cup of warm tea every 2 to 3 hours.

Ginger tea or capsules make good digestive aids to help soothe digestion, especially in cases of nervousness, stress, or illness.

Ginger contains lecithin, which helps break down fats, making it useful for the cardiovascular system and weight control.

Ginger has anti-inflammatory properties, making it beneficial for headaches, joint pain and stiffness, musculoskeletal aches and pains, etc.

Enjoy a cup of warm ginger root tea to help overcome a chill and increase circulation.

Tip:  Ginger is warming and peppermint is cooling.  Combine these two for a nice balance.

Add ground ginger to pancake batter, oatmeal, soup, baked goods, smoothies, and stir-fries.  Use fresh ginger root to spice up fish, chicken, and beef dishes.

Caution:  Avoid ginger if you have peptic ulcers.

One of my favorite reference books:  20,000 Secrets of TEA by Victoria Zak.  I found mine for $5 at Barnes & Noble.  Here’s a link to one on Amazon:

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.  It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need.  Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.