God’s Pharmacy for Healthy Living

3 John 1:2–

“Dear Friend, I pray that you may enjoy good health and that all may go well with you, even as your soul is getting along well.”

I hope that you are all well–body, mind, and spirit–as we walk through this unprecedented time in our lives.  There is much conflicting and unknown information about COVID-19, but the one thing of which we can be certain is that God is in control.  Daniel 2:21–“He controls the course of world events; He removes kings and sets up other kings.  He gives wisdom to the wise and knowledge to the scholars.”   Truth and understanding come from God.

With that in mind, let’s look at some ways that we can keep ourselves healthy.

God created our immune system to fight against disease, and our job is to support it.  There is no magic pill that can take the place of a healthy lifestyle.

1.  Practice peace (the opposite of stress).  Fear and anxiety weaken the immune system.  Philippians 4:6–“Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.”  2 Timothy 1:7–“For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but one of power, love, and sound judgement.”  Psalm 56:3–“When I am afraid, I will trust in you.”  Isaiah 26:3–“You will keep in perfect peace the mind that is dependent on You, for it is trusting in you.”

2.  Wash your hands.  Mark 7:4–“When they come from the marketplace, they do not eat unless they have washed.  And there are many other customs they have received and keep, like the washing of cups, jugs, copper utensils, and dining couches.”  Leviticus 15:11–“If the man with the discharge touches anyone without first rinsing his hands in water, the person who was touched is to wash his clothes and bathe with water, and he will remain unclean until evening.”

3.  Practice quarantine.  Leviticus 15:13–“When the man with the discharge has been cured of it, he is to count seven days for his cleansing, wash his clothes, and bathe his body in fresh water; he will be clean.”

4.  Sleep (7 to 8 hours a night for adults) is important for allowing the body to repair and rebuild.  Psalm 4:8–“In peace I will lie down and sleep, for you alone, Lord, make me dwell in safety.”

5.  Get 20 to 30 minutes of moderate daily exercise.  Movement keeps our lymph system working to “take out the trash”.  Take hourly breaks from sitting.  Clean the house, pull some weeds, walk around the block, put on some music and dance, etc.  Feel free to check out my Exercise at Home with Lisa Facebook Group for some simple exercise routines you can do anytime (balance, cardio, WholyFit, etc.).  The link to join is Exercise at Home with Lisa

6.  Fresh air and sunshine help to increase vitamin D and alleviate depression, positively affecting the immune system.  Deep breathing helps to strengthen the lungs and remove toxins.

7.  Drink enough pure water to dilute toxins and mucus so they can be removed from the body.  A stagnant river is a breeding ground for disease.  Keep your internal river flowing with enough pure water.  Squeeze 1/2 lemon into a cup of water for its vitamin C content, which helps fight infections.

8.  Eat food as closely to the way God created it as possible to obtain nutrients and fiber that help create an environment where viruses can’t thrive.  Highly processed foods are poor in nutrients and fiber and can create a hospitable environment for viruses. 

Learn to read labels and count fiber instead of calories.  Eat a minimum of 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day.

9.  Replace negative character traits with positive ones.  Colossians 3:12-14–“Therefore, God’s chosen ones, holy and loved, put on heartfelt compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience, accepting one another and forgiving one another if anyone has a complaint against another.  Just as the Lord has forgiven you, so also you must forgive.  Above all, put on love–the perfect bond of unity.”

Good health starts with a healthy spirit!

10. Keep learning to be healthy!  Join my private Facebook Group:  Learning to be Healthy with Lisa.

If you need more help with healthy eating, check out my programs at www.learningtobehealthy.com.

Blessings of health,

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritional Consultant

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

The Flu Vaccine–Yes or No?

It’s that time of year to decide whether or not you will get a flu vaccination. My advice as a health coach is to always make an informed decision about anything that affects the health of you and your family.

Information comes from everywhere–the internet, television ads, magazines, billboards, doctors, pharmacies, people you know, etc. Consider the sources–are they trying to sell you something or were they educated for marketing purposes (e.g. pharmacy companies educating doctors and clinics)?

Are you being made aware of any adverse effects? Are you reading the labels? Is what’s right for someone else right for you?

I believe in self-education, because no one knows your body like you do. Learn more about the flu vaccine at National Vaccine Information Center (www.nvic.org).

Personally, I do not get the flu vaccination. Instead, I strengthen my immune system to help fight viruses. My biggest concern with vaccines is the many toxic additives (like aluminum) that may contribute to chronic disease.

Here are a few things that I do at the first sign of illness:

Drink a cup of water with the juice of half a lemon and a dash of cayenne pepper. Sometimes, I add a little raw honey.

Take elderberry, which has been studied and shown to reduce the “shelf life” of viruses. It comes in syrup, tea, capsules, tinctures, and chewables.

Take vitamin D3 to help support my immune system. Have your levels checked every six months or so to see if you fall within the optimum range of 50-60 ng/ml. In the absence of adequate sunlight, especially during winter, levels can drop, providing less protection against the flu and other viruses.

Eat seasonal foods rich in vitamin C: citrus, organic peppers, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, organic potatoes.

Eat seasonal foods rich in sulfur: onions, garlic, cruciferous vegetables, eggs, sardines (eggs and sardines also contain vitamin D3).

Make sure that my digestive system is working well to eliminate toxins by eating plenty of fiber-rich plant foods and taking a probiotic, since 70 to 80% of the immune system is in the gut.

Hydrate with lots of water and nourishing soups to help flush toxins and keep mucous thin so secondary respiratory infections don’t easily take hold.

Take very warm detox baths with a few drops of lavender essential oil, which has anti-viral and calming properties. Diffusing eucalyptus essential oil is wonderful for a stuffy nose and congestion.

Stop eating refined sugar. Instead of reaching for carbonated soft drinks, popsicles, ice cream, etc., try bone broth, fruit and veggie smoothies, homemade soups, green tea, and herbal teas (God’s pharmacy). I like peppermint, ginger, chamomile, raspberry leaf, elderberry, and holy basil (tulsi). Try stirring a little ground cinnamon into a cup of warm water with some raw honey.

Have some natural cough syrups on hand. Two I like are Olba’s Cough Syrupand Zarbee’s Naturals Kid’s Cough Syrup + Mucous.

Rest, pray, and nourish my spirit with the Word of God–“Be still and know that I am God.” Psalm 46:10a

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory.”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

Register now for the free online Autoimmune Revolution from November 5-11.

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Why I don’t Take Calcium–#3

In Why I don’t Take Calcium–#1 and Why I don’t Take Calcium–#2, we looked at how excess calcium in the body is a likely indicator of calcium being pulled from the bones, and that it can also contribute to inflammation in the arteries and other parts of the body, raising the risk of chronic degenerative diseases.

Next, we learned that optimal levels of vitamin C help to reduce inflammation, keep calcium in the bones, lower the risk of fracture, and reduce excess deposits and calcifications in other places. Calcium-laden kidney stones are one example of a vitamin C deficiency.

Let’s look at some various forms of vitamin C supplements:

Ascorbic acid is a common form of vitamin C, but it can upset some people’s stomach due to its acidity. Synthetic vitamin C is usually made from corn, which may be genetically modified. Look for companies that make certified non-GMO products.

Sodium ascorbate is a form of ascorbic acid that is more alkaline, so it is better tolerated when taking large doses. It does not raise blood pressure or cause fluid retention like sodium chloride.

Calcium ascorbate is a combination of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and calcium. This form is often used to help buffer excess acid, making it easier on the stomach. If you are concerned about excess calcium, this would not be the desirable form of vitamin C.

Magnesium ascorbate is a non-acidic combination of magnesium and ascorbic acid, making it easy on the stomach. Many of us are deficient in magnesium, which is also needed for bone health, making this a desirable form. Unfortunately, magnesium ascorbate can be more expensive.

Potassium ascorbate contains both vitamin C and potassium, so it should be taken only under the advice of your health care provider. Too much potassium can cause health problems, especially if you are taking large amounts of potassium ascorbate and/or taking other supplements or medications that contain potassium. On the other hand, if your lab tests show that you need potassium, this may be a beneficial form of vitamin C for you.

Ascorbyl palmitate is a fat-soluble form of vitamin C that provides extra anti-oxidant protection to cells that most water-soluble forms of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) cannot offer. Liposomal delivery (helps with deeper penetration of the nutrient) of ascorbyl palmitate has been used to slow skin aging and has been demonstrated to kill cancer cells in vitro and slow tumor growth in mice more effectively than with ascorbic acid.

Read the labels of all your supplements, medications, and even the food you eat. See if they include any of the above forms of vitamin C.

Dr. Levy, in his book Death by Calcium, recommends a Multi-C Protocol,using liposome-encapsulated vitamin C, sodium ascorbate powder, ascorbyl palmitate, and even intravenously administered vitamin C. For more information on his protocol, see his book.

Note: Vitamin C is safe and non-toxic, even in large amounts, but those with chronic kidney problems need to always check with their doctor before taking any supplements.

If you are looking for a whole-food form of vitamin C, you might consider one made from amla berries.

The free Alzheimer’s and Dementia online summit starts Monday, July 23!

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

www.learningtobehealthy.com

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.

Why I don’t Take Calcium–#2

In Why I don’t Take Calcium–#1″, we learned that, according to research, taking calcium supplements and/or increasing dietary intake of calcium does not reduce the risk of bone fracture. Also, that an excess build up of calcium in the body can increase the risk of heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, stroke, and other degenerative diseases.

There’s no doubt that bones need calcium to build new bones, but Dr. Levy, in his book Death by Calcium, states that “Calcium migration from the bone is not the cause of osteoporosis, but rather a symptom of it.” So, then, what is the root cause?

It might surprise you to find out (it did me) that a vitamin C deficiency in the bone can lead to a severe loss of bone-building cells and an increase in bone-dissolving cells. Vitamin C acts as an anti-oxidant to protect bones from cellular damage, which contributes to osteoporosis. Studies have confirmed that oxidative stress plays a role in the cause of osteoporosis.

Collagen is necessary in both the formation and strengthening of new bone. Vitamin C is essential to making collagen.

Clinical observations show that a vitamin C deficiency decreases calcium deposition into bones and increases calcium excretion from bones. The excreted calcium can accumulate in other tissues, like arterial walls.

There is a loss of estrogen during menopause, which results in a loss of calcium from bones. Vitamin C has been shown to strengthen bones in both post-menopausal women and lab rats who had their ovaries removed to induce menopause.

The Framingham Osteoporosis Study found that those with the highest vitamin C intake had significantly fewer hip fractures compared to those with the lowest intake.

Research continues to find that the combination of excess calcium and vitamin C deficiency is found at the tissue sites of chronic degenerativediseases. Excess calcium deposits contribute to oxidative stress, and vitamin C is an anti-oxidant to help prevent damage caused by this stress. When oxidative stress is kept in check, calcium can stay in the bones.

In the case of atherosclerosis, the body uses calcium from the blood to produce plaque in the arteries to support weak vessels (due to chronic oxidative stress). The body then pulls calcium from bones into the bloodstream so it will be available for more arterial repair. Sufficient vitamin C levels would help reduce this stress on the arteries, diminishing the need for more calcium to support the arteries.

Besides the coronary arteries, excess blood calcium can be deposited into cells throughout the body (brain, breasts, prostate, etc.). Excess blood calcium can come from dietary calcium, calcium supplements, and/or calcium pulled out of bones. When there are optimal levels of vitamin C present, dietary calcium is deposited into the bones, and any excess is excreted via the kidneys.

Eliminating a vitamin C deficiency is one important step toward improving bone health, as well as reducing the risk of other chronic diseases.

In the next newsletter, I’ll explore various types and benefits of vitamin C supplements and their therapeutic uses.

Keep learning to be healthy!

Lisa Hernandez, Certified Nutritionist & Health Coach

www.learningtobehealthy.com

1 Corinthians 10:31–“Whatever you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for God’s glory!”

This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease. It does not take the place of any medical care that you may need. Consult your health care provider about making dietary and lifestyle changes that are right for you.